Lycogala epidendrum - Wolfs Milk - Plasmodial Slime Mold

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SCIENTIFIC CLASSIFICATION Amoebozoa
KINGDOM
(Amoebozoa) 
PHYLUM
Myxomycota  – slime molds, myxomycètes
CLASS
Myxomycetes  – acellular slime molds, plasmoidial
ORDER
Liceales 
FAMILY
Reticulariaceae
GENUS
Lycogala 
SPECIES
epidendrum (Lycogala epidendrum)

 

 The Lycogala epidendrum is a primordial plasma and as if thats not cool enough it is also a creeper!

Lycogala epidendrum Also known as Wolfs Milk
Creative Commons Licence
This photo by Stephen McKechnie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

"Slime moulds are not considered true fungi. Their fruiting bodies resemble fungi but at other stages in their life they act more like animals, moving through rotten wood eating bacteria, spores and other organic matter." Source Link : www.ojibway.ca  includes a few more images at different ages and a look in the side of the log.)

Sporangia: Pinkish to brownish balls or cushions on wood, filled with pink paste.

Plasmodium: Reddish mass.

 Lycogala epidendrum Also known as Wolfs Milk
Creative Commons Licence
This
photo by Stephen McKechnie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

"{Plasmodium stage} This stage is the creepy stage. Like something out of a B-movie, the slime mold plasmodium is a mass of glistening veinlike material that creeps across dead leaves or wood at the rate of as much as an inch per hour, growing, eating, and probably doing other nasty things we don't even want to know about. There are no cell walls in the plasmodium, and its motion is the result of protoplasm flowing rhythmically through the organism." Michael Kuo http://www.mushroomexpert.com/myxomycetes.html

Lycogala epidendrum Also known as Wolfs Milk
Creative Commons Licence
This photo by Stephen McKechnie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Crazy Slime Mold Solving a Maze here! This is insane!


You can see young Plasmodia moving here

This thing is a creeper!

Lycogala epidendrum - Wolfs Milk - Plasmodial Slime
Creative Commons Licence
This photo by Stephen McKechnie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License.

Here are some videos:
 Slime Moulds Time Lapse, Comatricha sp, and Slime Mould Forms a Map of the Tokyo-area Railway System slime moulds doing amazing things:

 


 


About the above video: Princeton biology professor emeritus John Bonner has studied slime molds for nearly 70 years.

"[Myxomycetes are] no more than a bag of amoebae encased in a thin slime sheath, yet they manage to have various behaviours that are equal to those of animals who possess muscles and nerves with ganglia--that is, simple brains". John Tyler Bonner

 

English in text

 PhysarumPlus - "An Internet Resource for Students of Physarum polycephalum and Other Acellular Slime Molds"

 Introduction to the Slime Molds - At Berkeley

 Fuligo septica, the Dog Vomit Slime Mold - At Tom Volk's Fungi

 Hemitrichula serpula, the Pretzel Slime Mold - At Tom Volk's Fungi

 Hunting Slime Molds - At Smithsonian Magazine

Botany Photo of the Day

 

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